Imaging tests, or radiology tests, take pictures of the inside of your body for your doctor’s review. These tests help find cancer, how far it has spread and whether your cancer treatment works for you. What are imaging tests? Imaging tests take pictures of the inside of...

When your doctor checks for cancer, he or she may need to take tissue or cell samples from one or more parts of your body. The tumor’s location and suspected type of cancer determine how the doctor takes these samples. Some biopsies involve removal of tumor...

Cancer of the blood-developing cells of your bone marrow, called chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), invades your blood and spreads to other areas of your body. CML only accounts for about ten percent of leukemia patients. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Chronic myeloid leukemia occurs through genetic mutations...

Among teens and children, the most common cancer is leukemia. One of three people with cancer before adulthood have leukemia. Most young people with childhood leukemia gain a diagnosis of lymphocytic leukemia, while most of those not falling into this classification gain diagnosis of acute...

Thyroid cancer develops in your thyroid gland. Many thyroid gland growths and tumors are non-cancerous, benign. But many are malignant cancers that can spread to other parts of your body. Malignant thyroid cancers include: Differentiated cancers, including papillary, follicular and Hurthle cell Medullary Anaplastic, an...

Cancer spreading to other parts of your body is called metastasis. Doctors also call it metastatic cancer or stage 4 cancer. Naming your metastasized cancer sometimes causes confusion. A good example of this is breast cancer after it spreads in your body, such as to your...

Many cancer patients about to undergo their first treatments fear side effects. But your treatment team exists to help you get through these procedures and their after-effects, through preventing and managing those side effects. Anytime you suffer ill effects of cancer treatment, talk to your...

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develops from young white blood cells in your bone marrow. These cells are called lymphocytes. From the bone marrow, this cancer goes into your blood and spreads throughout the body, such as to the lymph nodes, spleen and liver. CLL cancer...

Acute myeloid leukemia most commonly affects aging adults. Doctors refer to this leukemia under several names, including: Acute myelocytic leukemia Acute myelogenous leukemia Acute granulocytic leukemia Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia AML About Acute Myeloid Leukemia AML cancer cells grow uncontrollably from cells normally developing into blood cells, spreading...

Pancreatic cancer develops from rapidly growing, out-of-control cells in the pancreas. Your pancreas sits behind your stomach where the first part of your small intestine begins. Different types of tumors affect the pancreas, either in exocrine or endocrine cells. Your diagnosis of exocrine or endocrine...

Stomach cancer, sometimes called gastric cancer, develops in your stomach and usually grows over the course of many years before detection. This cancer typically starts as precancerous changes in the stomach’s inner lining. What symptoms your stomach cancer presents depends on the cancer’s location in your...

Kidney cancer starts in your kidneys. This cancer usually takes the form of renal cell carcinoma, the most common type of kidney cancer. About 90 percent of kidney cancer patients gain diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. About Renal Cell Carcinoma Renal cell carcinoma includes several subtypes, according...

Cancer treatment commonly results in side effects like nausea and vomiting. There are multiple reasons why this happens, including gastrointestinal tract irritation, brain chemical changes, anxiety and nervousness during treatment. Nausea is the queasiness in your stomach, whether vomiting accompanies this feeling or not. There...